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About Bodrighy Wood

2014-04-12 10.41.55

Pete making shavings


My name is Pete Moncrieff-Jury and I am a full time professional woodturner based in Wiltshire, a member of the Register of Professional Turners and the Association of Wood Turners of Great Britain. I also hold a Certificate of Education qualifying me to teach.

My trade name originates from the name of the house, Bodrigy, that I was born in on the Lizard peninsular in Cornwall and is pronounced bod-ree-ghee. 

Being Cornish by birth and Welsh by upbringing and descendancy may explain the Celtic influence in some of my work. My interest in eastern art is also perhaps understandable as I went to sea straight from school and for much of the next twelve years travelled around India, the Persian Gulf and as far as Japan. 

 Wood turning is, in my opinion, both a craft and an art form and I endeavor to reflect this in my work. As well as the Celtic, oriental and medieval influences, I also try to work with the wood often using roots, old beams, and other pieces that have a natural beauty that is often hidden. The different grain, figuring and colouring in wood is a natural art form of itself and I try to highlight this in a piece where possible.

I feel strongly about the environmental impact of harvesting wood that is not easily replaced and so try not to use exotic woods which are often bordering on extinction. Many of our native trees such as blackthorn and apple, not usually commercially used, have a wonderful natural beauty of their own as do many of the trees grown on estates and in gardens and so wherever possible I use woods that are either native to the UK or are grown and felled here.

I occasionally use other materials such as metals, leather and stone in my pieces and also my wife and I collaborate to create pieces that are decorated with artwork and pyrography to create both artistic and practical items .

All the above has led me inevitably to the wabi sabi philosophy which is all about finding beauty in imperfection and profundity in nature, accepting the natural cycle of growth, decay, and death. Wabi-Sabi is everything that today’s sleek, mass-produced, technology-saturated culture isn’t. It celebrates cracks and crevices and rot and all the other marks that time, weather and use leave behind. To discover wabi-sabi is to see the singular beauty in something that may to modern society look decrepit and ugly.

 

 

 

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